Lake Cuyamaca

Recreation and Park District

Trout

Trout that live in different environments can have dramatically different colorations and patterns. For the most part, these colors and patterns form as camouflage based on their surroundings and will change as the fish moves to different habitats. Trout in or newly returned from the sea can look silvery, while the same genetic fish living in a small stream or in an alpine lake could have pronounced markings and more vivid coloration; it is also possible that in some species this signifies that they are ready to mate. It is virtually impossible to define a particular color pattern as belonging to a specific breed, however, in general, wild fish are claimed to have more vivid colors and patterns.

 

Trout have fins entirely without spines, and all of them have a small adipose fin along the back, near the tail. The pelvic fins sit well back on the body, on each side of the anus. The swim bladder is connected to the esophagus, allowing for gulping or rapid expulsion of air, a condition known as physostome. Unlike many other physostome fish, trout do not use their bladder as an auxiliary device for oxygen uptake, relying solely on their gills.